• Bikaner school indian miniature, XIXth century

    Region:India

    Period:Bikaner school, XIXth century

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Collection of the Maharadja of Bikaner
    Collection Of Pastor H. Maas, The Netherlands.

    Painting in good condition, framed.

  • Mughul school indian miniature, XVIIIth century

    Region:India

    Period:Mughul school, XVIIIth century

    Media:Gouache on paper

    This nice miniature represents a princess with flower.

    The most important of Bikaner in the field of art has been its miniaturised paintings. Its rich craftsmanship was greatly influenced by the Mughals and many Mughal painters were encouraged to attend the court at Bikaner.

    In fact the Mughal influence on the Rajputs, led to a new style of painting: the royal portrait. Bikaner because of its intimate relations with the Mughals was one of the first schools to adopt this style.

    Collection of the Maharadja of Bikaner
    Collection Of Pastor H. Maas, The Netherlands.

    Painting in good condition, framed.

  • Bikaner school indian miniature, XVIIIth century

    Region:India

    Period:unknown

    Media:Gouache on paper

    This painting depicts the incarnation of Vishnu as a fish.

    Vishnu took the shape of a fish to fight Hayagriva, the aquatic demon. On this picture, the demon crawl into a shell, but Vishnu drag him out by the hair.

    Collection of the Maharadja of Bikaner
    Collection Of Pastor H. Maas, The Netherlands.

    Painting in good condition, framed.

  • Kangra pahari school indian miniature, 1840

    Region:unknown

    Period:Kangra Pahari school, 1840

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Pahari paintings, as the name suggests, were paintings executed in the hilly regions of India, in the sub-Himalayan state of Himachal Pradesh. It is in the development and modification of Pahari paintings, that the Kangra School features. Under the patronage of Maharaja Sansar Chand, it became the most important center of Pahari painting.

    Coll. Ron Fitzgerald, Canada.

    Painting in good condition and framed.

  • Indian miniature

    Region:India

    Period:unknown

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Painting in good condition and framed.

  • Hinduist indian miniature, ca. 1840

    Region:India

    Period:ca. 1840

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Hinduist miniature.

    Painting in good condition and framed.

  • Kangra pahari school indian miniature, 1840

    Region:India

    Period:Kangra pahari school indian miniature, 1840

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Pahari paintings, as the name suggests, were paintings executed in the hilly regions of India, in the sub-Himalayan state of Himachal Pradesh. It is in the development and modification of Pahari paintings, that the Kangra School features. Under the patronage of Maharaja Sansar Chand, it became the most important center of Pahari painting.

    Coll. Ron Fitzgerald, Canada.

    Painting in good condition and framed.

  • Bikaner school indian miniature representing Krishna as a Gopa, XIXth century

    Region:India

    Period:Bikaner school, XIXth century

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Krishna seated in a lotus blossom playing his flute to a lone cow, watched by a white peahen.

    Bikaner school takes its roots in Mughal artists paintings which were presented to the king as token of friendship (from Raja Rai Singh, 1571-1611).

    They specialized in themes such as Ramayana, Mahabharata, Krishna legends, Ragmala and love scenes of Radha and Krishna.

    Collection of the Maharadja of Bikaner
    Collection Of Pastor H. Maas, The Netherlands.

    Painting in good condition, framed.

  • Kangra Pahari school indian miniature, 1840

    Region:India

    Period:Kangra pahari school, 1840

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Pahari paintings, as the name suggests, were paintings executed in the hilly regions of India, in the sub-Himalayan state of Himachal Pradesh. It is in the development and modification of Pahari paintings, that the Kangra School features. Under the patronage of Maharaja Sansar Chand, it became the most important center of Pahari painting.

    Coll. Ron Fitzgerald, Canada.

    Painting in good condition and framed.

  • Bikaner school miniature, XIXth century

    Region:India

    Period:Bikaner school, XIXth century

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Krishna standing in a lotus blossom playing his flute with two white peahen.

    Bikaner school takes its roots in Mughal artists paintings which were presented to the king as token of friendship (from Raja Rai Singh, 1571-1611).

    They specialized in themes such as Ramayana, Mahabharata, Krishna legends, Ragmala and love scenes of Radha and Krishna.

    Collection of the Maharadja of Bikaner
    Collection Of Pastor H. Maas, The Netherlands.

    Painting in good condition, framed.

  • Kangra Pahari school miniature, 1840

    Region:India

    Period:Kangra Pahari school, 1840

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Pahari paintings, as the name suggests, were paintings executed in the hilly regions of India, in the sub-Himalayan state of Himachal Pradesh. It is in the development and modification of Pahari paintings, that the Kangra School features. Under the patronage of Maharaja Sansar Chand, it became the most important center of Pahari painting.

    Coll. Ron Fitzgerald, Canada.

    Painting in good condition and framed.

  • Bikaner school miniature, XIXth century

    Region:India

    Period:Bikaner school, XIXth century, probably ca. 1820

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Painting representing Shankaracharya (head of Hindu monastery) and a servant.

    Collection of the Maharadja of Bikaner
    Collection Of Pastor H. Maas, The Netherlands.

    Painting in good condition, framed.

  • Mewar school miniature, 1760

    Region:India

    Period:Mewar school, 1760

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Mewar is one of the most important schools of Indian miniature painting of the 17th and 18th centuries. It is a school in the Rajasthani style and was developed in the Hindu principality of Mewar (in Rajasthan state). The works of the school are characterized by simple bright colour and direct emotional appeal.

    Starting in 1605, the Mewar school continued through the 18th century and into the 19th. An increasing number of paintings were concerned with portraiture and the life of the ruler, though religious themes continued to be popular.

    Collection Of Pastor H. Maas, The Netherlands.

    Painting in very good condition, framed.

    Please note that the discoloration of the right half of the picture is due to the presence of a light reflexion on the glass protecting the painting, not to a fading of the miniature itself !

  • Jodhpur school indian miniature, 1850

    Region:India

    Period:Jodhpur school, 1850

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Court painting in Jodhpur developed during 17th Century through the association of Marwar's Rulers with the Mughal Emperors. During the 18th and 19th centuries it evolved into a distinctive Rajasthani style, combining Mughal naturalism with local folk style and bold colours.

    Jodhpur paintings later took on an even more exuberant turn under Maharaja Man Singh (1803-43), and dozens of paintings of the ruler, his nobles and his ladies were made. Most of these are densely packed scenes of festivity or processions, but Man Singh was also a devoutly religious man, and he commissioned many paintings of his gurus and himself at worship, and religious texts like the Ramayana, the Durga Charitra and the Shiva Rahasya, as well as more obscure texts dealing with Nath philosophies.

    These imposing paintings often show great imagination in dealing with such large surfaces, often using unexpected changes of scale, division of the page into smaller sections, even showing successive stages of a story on one page.

    Coll. Van der Veren, The Netherland

    Painting in perfect condition, framed.

  • Kota school miniature, XVIIth century

    Region:India

    Period:Kota school, XVIIth century

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Kota paintings look very natural in their appearance and are calligraphic in their execution. The reign of Jagat Singh (1658-1684) saw vivacious colors and bold lines being used in portraitures. With the arrival of Arjun Singh (1720-1723), the painting started depicting males with a long hooked nose.

    This painting represent a Shankaracharya (head of monastery, and Hindu saint).

    Condition as illustrated, unframed (can be framed on demand).

  • Kangra Pahari miniature, 1840

    Region:India

    Period:Kangra Pahari school, 1840

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Pahari paintings, as the name suggests, were paintings executed in the hilly regions of India, in the sub-Himalayan state of Himachal Pradesh. It is in the development and modification of Pahari paintings, that the Kangra School features. Under the patronage of Maharaja Sansar Chand, it became the most important center of Pahari painting.

    Coll. Ron Fitzgerald, Canada.

    Painting in good condition and framed.

  • Indian miniature, 1800

    Region:India

    Period:1800

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Painting in good condition, framed

  • Kangra school erotic miniature, 1830

    Region:India

    Period:Kangra school, 1830

    Media:Gouache on paper

    The pictorial art of Kangra is one of the finest gifts of India to the art-world, named after Kangra, Himachal Pradesh, a former princely state, which patronized the art.

    The focal theme of Kangra painting is Shringar (the erotic sentiment). The subjects seen in Kangra painting exhibit the taste and the traits of the life style of the society of that period. Bhakti cult was the driving force and the love story of Radha and Krishna was the main source of spiritual experience, which was also the base for the visual expression.

    Kangra paintings depict the feminine charm in a very graceful soft and refined manner.

    Collection Kapoor, USA

    Painting in perfect condition, framed.

  • Bikaner school image of a prince, 1780

    Region:India

    Period:Bikaner school, 1780

    Media:Gouache on paper

    This painting shows the portrait of a prince.

    The most important of Bikaner in the field of art has been its miniaturised paintings. An illustration of the art can be found on the walls and ceilings of Junagarh fort, and inside the cenotaphs of the erstwhile rulers of Bikaner. Its rich craftsmanship was greatly influenced by the Mughals and many Mughal painters were encouraged to attend the court at Bikaner.

    In fact the Mughal influence on the Rajputs, led to a new style of painting: the royal portrait. Bikaner because of its intimate relations with the Mughals was one of the first schools to adopt this style.

    Collection Miog, The Netherlands

    Painting in good condition, framed.

    Please note: discoloration on picture are due to light reflection on the glass, not to fading of the painting itself.

  • Ari Singh equestrian portrait, Udaipur school, 1760

    Region:India, Rajasthan

    Period:Udaipur school, 1760

    Media:Gouache on paper

    An equestrian portrait of Maharaja Ari Singh with attendants

    The Maharaja dressed in a white angarkha with a green and gold halo behind his face, accompanied by attendants holding various emblems of royalty, all on a gray background.

    Painting in good condition, framed

  • Bikaner school miniature, XIXth century

    Region:India

    Period:Bikaner school, XIXth century

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Collection of the Maharadja of Bikaner
    Collection Of Pastor H. Maas, The Netherlands.

    Painting in good condition, framed.

  • Indian miniature

    Region:India

    Period:unknown

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Painting condition as illustrated, unframed (can be framed on demand).

  • Bikaner school miniature, XVIIIth century

    Region:India

    Period:Bikaner school, XVIIIth century

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Portrait of a saint with three followers.

    Collection of the Maharadja of Bikaner.

    Painting in fair condition (some chips on the borders, none affecting the painting itself, see illustrations), unframed (can be framed on demand).

  • Miniature painting, India

    Region:India

    Period:unknown

    Media:Gouache on paper

    Painting in poor condition, see illustration. Unframed (can be framed on demand).

  • Depiction of Avalokitesvara in silver, XVIIIth century, Tibet

    Region:Tibet

    Period:XVIIIe century

    Media:silver

    Avalokitesvara [Lord who looks down] is a bodhisattva embodying the compassion of all Buddhas. He is one of the more widely revered bodhisattvas in mainstream Mahayana Buddhism.

    According to Mahayana doctrine, Avalokitesvara is the bodhisattva who has made a great vow to listen to the prayers of all sentient beings in times of difficulty, and to postpone his own Buddhahood until he has assisted every being on Earth in achieving nirvana.

    In Tibetan, Avalokitesvara is known as Chenrezig, and is said to be incarnated in the Dalai Lama, the Karmapa and other high Lamas.

  • XIIth century cambodian tantric Deva

    Region:Cambodia

    Period:XIIth century

    Media:bronze

    Devas (in Khmer called tep or preah) are non-human beings more powerful or more blissful than humans. Those, for instance, living in the RupaLoka.

    From a human perspective, devas share the characteristic of being invisible to the physical human eye and can only be detected by those humans who have opened an extrasensory power by which one can see beings from other planes. Their voices can also be heard by those who have cultivated a similar power of the ear.

    Most devas are also capable of constructing illusory forms by which they can manifest themselves to the beings of lower worlds; higher and lower devas even have to do this between each other.

  • Tang dynasty glazed pottery

    Region:China

    Period:Tang dynasty, 618-907

    Media:terra-cotta/glazed pottery no information, sorry !

  • XVth century indian Mohra

    Region:India, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, Sutley river

    Period:XVth century

    Media:bronze

    1 Mohra, sutley river, Himachal Pradesh, 15th century

  • XII/XIIIth century cambodian oillamp

    Region:Cambodia

    Period:XII-XIIIth century

    Media:bronze

    These oillamps were used in temples and their extremely regular circular design might originate from earlier turned woodworking tradition, as probably do the stone collumns adorning windows in Khmer buildings throughout Cambodia.

  • XII/XIIIth century cambodian oillamp

    Region:Cambodia

    Period:XII-XIIIth century

    Media:bronze

    These oillamps were used in temples and their extremely regular circular design might originate from earlier turned woodworking tradition, as probably do the stone collumns adorning windows in Khmer buildings throughout Cambodia.

  • Standing figure of Lakshmi/Radha

    Region:India

    Period:probably XVIIIth century

    Media:bronze

    Lakshmi is the consort of Vishnu (later reincanated as Radha, the childhood friend and lover of Krishna, reincarnation of Vishnu).

    Lakshmi is the Hindu goddess of wealth, prosperity (both material and spiritual), light, wisdom, fortune, fertility, generosity and courage; and the embodiment of beauty, grace and charm.

  • XVIth century tibetan bone Dharmapala

    Region:Tibet

    Period:XVIth century

    Media:bone

    A Dharma Protector (Dharmapala) is an emanation of a Buddha or a Bodhisattva whose main functions are to avert the inner and outer obstacles that prevent practitioners from gaining spiritual realizations, and to arrange all the necessary contitions for their practice.

    In Tibet every monastery had its own Dharma Protector, but the tradition did not begin in Tibet; the Mahayanists of ancient India also relied upon Dharma Protectors to eliminate hindrances and to fulfil their spiritual wishes.

  • XIIth century figure of a Deva

    Region:Cambodia

    Period:XIIth century

    Media:bronze

    Devas (in Khmer called tep or preah) are non-human beings more powerful or more blissful than humans. Those, for instance, living in the RupaLoka.

    From a human perspective, devas share the characteristic of being invisible to the physical human eye and can only be detected by those humans who have opened an extrasensory power by which one can see beings from other planes. Their voices can also be heard by those who have cultivated a similar power of the ear.

    Most devas are also capable of constructing illusory forms by which they can manifest themselves to the beings of lower worlds; higher and lower devas even have to do this between each other.

  • Tibetan Amithaba figure

    Region:Tibet

    Period:unknown

    Media:bronze

    Amitabha (Opame in tibetan) is the celestial Buddha of Infinite light.

    On this representation, he exhibits Samadhi Mudra his two palms folded face up, one on top of the other, lying on his lap.

    According to the Larger Sutra of Immeasurable Life Amitabha was, in very ancient times and possibly in another realm, a monk named Dharmakara, and/or in some versions of the sutra a former king who, having come into contact with the Buddhist teachings through the buddha Lokesvararaja, renounced his throne.

    He then resolved to become a buddha and so to come into possession of a buddhaksetra ("buddha-field", a realm existing in the primordial universe outside of space time, produced by a buddha's merit) expressed resolutions in forty-eight vows.

    In the versions of the sutra widely known in China, Vietnam, Korea and Japan, the eighteenth vow was that any being in any universe desiring to be born into Amitabha's Pure Land and calling upon his name even as few as ten times will be guaranteed rebirth there.

  • XV-XVIth century thai buddha

    Region:Thailand

    Period:XV-XVIth century

    Media:bronze

    This is an image of the historic buddha Sakyamuni, [the enlightened One], usual title given to the founder of Buddhism. He is also called the Tathagata [he who has come thus], Bhagavat [the Lord], and Sugata [well-gone]. He probably lived from 563 to 483 B.C.

    This figure have been casted in the Lan Na kingdom period (XV-XVIth century, Thailand).

    Seated in vajrasana, his left hand rest in his lap and his right performs the bhumisparsamudra. With this gesture he calls the earth to witness his victory over Mara, who was the last obstacle in his attainment of perfection.

    Rising from the crown of his head is a finial-topped ushnisa, the symbol denoting his wisdom.

    His elongated earlobes – stretched by the weight of princely jewellery in his earlier life – reflect his royal origins.

  • Tibetan Buddha figure

    Region:Tibet

    Period:unknown

    Media:bronze/copper alloy

    This is an image of the historic buddha Sakyamuni, [the enlightened One], usual title given to the founder of Buddhism. He is also called the Tathagata [he who has come thus], Bhagavat [the Lord], and Sugata [well-gone]. He probably lived from 563 to 483 B.C.

    Seated in vajrasana, over a double lotus throne, his left hand rest in his lap and his right performs the bhumisparsamudra. With this gesture he calls the earth to witness his victory over Mara, who was the last obstacle in his attainment of perfection.

    His elongated earlobes – stretched by the weight of princely jewellery in his earlier life – reflect his royal origins.

    He is dressed in a monastic robe that leaves his right shoulder uncovered.

  • Avalokitesvara figure, XIIth century, Bayon

    Region:Cambodia

    Period:Bayon period, second half of XIIth century

    Media:bronze

    Avalokitesvara [Lord who looks down] is a bodhisattva embodying the compassion of all Buddhas. He is one of the more widely revered bodhisattvas in mainstream Mahayana Buddhism.

    In Tibetan, Avalokitesvara is known as Chenrezig, and is said to be incarnated in the Dalai Lama, the Karmapa and other high Lamas.

    According to Mahayana doctrine, Avalokitesvara is the bodhisattva who has made a great vow to listen to the prayers of all sentient beings in times of difficulty, and to postpone his own Buddhahood until he has assisted every being on Earth in achieving nirvana.

  • Tibetan Mahasiddha figure, XIIIth century

    Region:Tibet

    Period:XIIIth century

    Media:bronze, inclusions of jade

    Mahasiddha [great adept] (maha meaning great and siddha meaning adept) is a term for someone who embodies and cultivates siddhi of perfection.

    A Mahasiddha is a tantric practitioner, who have sufficient attainments to act as a guru or tantric master, considered as a type of eccentric yogi in both Hinduism and Vajrayana Buddhism.

    They were people who transcended religious designation of whether vajrayana buddhism or hinduism and transcending all religious notion they were simply called Nath (master).

  • Sino-tibetan representation of Amitabha buddha, XVIIIth century

    Region:China/Tibet

    Period:XVIIIth century

    Media:bronze

    Amitabha is the celestial Buddha of Infinite light.

    On this representation, he exhibits Samadhi Mudra his two palms folded face up, one on top of the other, lying on his lap, and many sign of his royal rank.

    According to the Larger Sutra of Immeasurable Life Amitabha was, in very ancient times and possibly in another realm, a monk named Dharmakara, and/or in some versions of the sutra a former king who, having come into contact with the Buddhist teachings through the buddha Lokesvararaja, renounced his throne.

    He then resolved to become a buddha and so to come into possession of a buddhaksetra ("buddha-field", a realm existing in the primordial universe outside of space time, produced by a buddha's merit) expressed resolutions in forty-eight vows.

    In the versions of the sutra widely known in China, Vietnam, Korea and Japan, the eighteenth vow was that any being in any universe desiring to be born into Amitabha's Pure Land and calling upon his name even as few as ten times will be guaranteed rebirth there.

  • Nepalese Surya shrine, Malla period

    Region:Nepal

    Period:Malla period, XVIIth century

    Media:bronze

    From a Swiss collection

    In Hinduism, Surya [the Supreme Light] is the chief solar deity. The term Surya also refering to the Sun, in general. Surya has hair and arms of gold. He presides over "Ravi-waar" or Sunday.

    In Hindu religious literature, Surya is notably mentioned as the visible form of God that one can see every day. Furthermore, Shaivites and Vaishnavas often regard Surya as an aspect of Shiva and Vishnu, respectively.

    The presence of Ganesha, son of Shiva on one side leave to think that we are in a Shivaist representation of Surya.

  • Seated Khmer Buddha, Angkor period

    Region:Cambodia

    Period:Angkor period, XIIth century

    Media:bronze

    Object from an english private collection.

  • Undetermined asian object

    Region:unknown

    Period:unknown

    Media:bronze no information, sorry !

  • Three standing thai monks, XIXth century

    Region:Ratanakosin, Thailand

    Period:XIXth century

    Media:gilded bronze

    This is a set of three bronze gilded figures of monks, Ratanakoshin (Thailand) style, XIXth century.

    Collection Dupont, Belgium

  • Burmese standing buddha, XIXth century

    Region:Burma

    Period:XIXth century

    Media:wood, lacquered and guilded

    Although relatively recent compared to most of our offerings, we still selected this sculpture as an extremely good example of that particular style.

  • Tibetan Purbu dagger, XVIIth century

    Region:Tibet

    Period:XVIIth century

    Media:iron/silver

    Purbu "demon daggers" are magical instruments in the form of a dagger supposed to repel enemies and diseases.

    These purbus, elaborated in temples, were of extreme importance to the Tibetan masters/lamas who would use them to direct their prayers and excorcise demons.

    They are traditionally supposed to contain an alloy of "sky metal", meteoric iron found in the mountains and fields, iron beeing considered by tibetans as the most powerful metal in combating the demonic forces.

    This is a very good example of purbu.

  • Dong Son bell

    Region:Vietnam

    Period:Dong Son, IInd century BC to Ist century AD, likely to be early

    Media:bronze

    Little is known about the culture which occupied northern Vietnam between 3rd century BC and 1st AD.

    That culture have been called Dong Son from the region where were excavated the first metal objects in 1924.

    A huge variety of objects have been found: weaponry, living ustensils, jewelry and musical instruments abounds. Drums and bells are the dominant musical instruments founds, often casted with remarkable skill, even in today standards.

  • Wooden Kinnari figure, Burma

    Region:Burma

    Period:XVIIIth century

    Media:wood

    Kinnara (male) and Kinnari (female) are chimeric creatures half human-half bird (in India, half horse instead).

    They both are lower creatures of pleasure, kinnaras beeing lovers and celestial musicians where Kinnaris are renowned for their dance, song, poetry beauty and grace.

    A citation of the Mahabharata describes them as: "We are everlasting lover and beloved. We never separate. We are eternally husband and wife; never do we become mother and father. No offspring is seen in our lap. We are lover and beloved ever-embracing. In between us we do not permit any third creature demanding affection. Our life is a life of perpetual pleasure."

    Burmese Buddhists believe that out of the 136 past animal lives of Buddha, four were Kinnaras.

  • Citula circular pot, Cambodia XIIth century

    Region:Cambodia

    Period:XIIth century

    Media:bronze no information, sorry !

  • Soapstone Buddha, Thailand, XVIIIth century

    Region:Thailand

    Period:XVIIIth century

    Media:stone (soapstone)

    This is an image of the historic buddha Sakyamuni, [the enlightened One] in soapstone. Sakyamuni is the usual title given to the founder of Buddhism. He is also called the Tathagata [he who has come thus], Bhagavat [the Lord], and Sugata [well-gone]. He probably lived from 563 to 483 B.C.

    Seated in vajrasana, his left hand rest in his lap and his right performs the bhumisparsamudra. With this gesture he calls the earth to witness his victory over Mara, who was the last obstacle in his attainment of perfection.

    His elongated earlobes – stretched by the weight of princely jewellery in his earlier life – reflect his royal origins.

    He is dressed in a monastic robe that leaves his right shoulder uncovered.

  • Buddha Sakyamuni, silver alloy, Cambodia, XIXth century

    Region:Cambodia

    Period:XIXth century

    Media:metal (silver alloy)

    This is an image of the historic buddha Sakyamuni, [the enlightened One] in silver alloy. Sakyamuni is the usual title given to the founder of Buddhism. He is also called the Tathagata [he who has come thus], Bhagavat [the Lord], and Sugata [well-gone]. He probably lived from 563 to 483 B.C.

    Seated in vajrasana, his left hand rest in his lap and his right performs the bhumisparsamudra. With this gesture he calls the earth to witness his victory over Mara, who was the last obstacle in his attainment of perfection.

    His elongated earlobes – stretched by the weight of princely jewellery in his earlier life – reflect his royal origins.

    He is dressed in a monastic robe that leaves his right shoulder uncovered.

  • Royal figure, Kerala, XVIIth century

    Region:India

    Period:XVIIth century

    Media:bronze

    An indian king on animal.

    The Kerala style originate from the region of the same name, in southwestern India. The main religion in that area is Hinduism, which give its iconography to this royal portrait.

    Private swiss collection.

  • Buddha Sakyamuni, Lan Na, Thailand, XVIth century

    Region:Thailand

    Period:Lan Na, XVIth century

    Media:bronze

    This is an image of the historic buddha Sakyamuni, [the enlightened One] in bronze. Sakyamuni is the usual title given to the founder of Buddhism. He is also called the Tathagata [he who has come thus], Bhagavat [the Lord], and Sugata [well-gone]. He probably lived from 563 to 483 B.C.

    Seated in vajrasana, his left hand rest in his lap and his right performs the bhumisparsamudra. With this gesture he calls the earth to witness his victory over Mara, who was the last obstacle in his attainment of perfection.

    His elongated earlobes – stretched by the weight of princely jewellery in his earlier life – reflect his royal origins.

    He is dressed in a monastic robe that leaves his right shoulder uncovered.

    This very nice and ancient object originates from a german private collection.

  • Figure of a Shawa saint, Vijayanagar, XVIIth century

    Region:India

    Period:Late Vijayanagar empire, XVIIth century

    Media:bronze

    The empire of Vijayanagar was established in 1336 and rose to prominence to stand against islamic invasions by the end of the 13th century. Still the history of the kingdom is mostly a pacific and tolerant one. The empire is named after its capital city of Vijayanagara, whose impressive ruins surround modern Hampi, now a World Heritage Site.

    It lasted until 1646 although its power declined after a major military defeat in 1565 by the Deccan sultanates.

    This magnificient sculpture of a Hindu Saint, can be seen as one of the last production of a kingdom that created numerous artistic and architectural treasures.

  • Shawa saint figure, Vijayanagar, XVIIth century

    Region:india

    Period:Vijayanagar, XVIIth century

    Media:bronze

    The kingdom of Vijayanagara have been the first hindu kingdom of India, its name originates from its capital city Vijayanagara (Vijay: victory, nagar: city).

    The kingdom lasted from 1336 to 1565, where it was almost destroyed by the musilm Deccan sultanat alliance. Venkata II (1586-1614) will re-conquer the lands but will fail to stabilize the authority, which was challenged by numerous rebellions and a succession war. Sriranga, the last king deceases in 1672.

  • Dong Son culture Vase

    Region:Vietnam

    Period:Dong Son culture, IInd century BC - Ist century AD, can also be attached to Nam Viêt or Giao Chi period (IV-IIIrd century BC)

    Media:bronze

    This exceptional large Dong Son vase can be attached to the begining of the Nam Viêt or Giao Chi period (IV-IIIrd century BC).

    It is a very fine example of the Dong Son culture production, to be compared to a similar vase in the Barbier Mueller collection (inv. 2505-14, published in Le profane et le divin, arts de l’Antiquité. Fleurons du musée Barbier-Mueller, musée Barbier-Mueller & Hazan (éd.), 2008 : p. 441.).

    Such vases sometimes appear in the representation of warships, together with men wearing feathers, bronze drums, under platforms, side by side with scenes of archery, etc...

  • Dong Son culture bracelets, Vietnam

    Region:Vietnam

    Period:Dong Son culture, IInd BC - Ist AD

    Media:bronze

    Little is known about the culture which occupied northern Vietnam between 3rd century BC and 1st AD.

    That culture have been called Dong Son from the region where were excavated the first metal objects in 1924.

    A huge variety of objects have been found: weaponry, living ustensils, jewelry and musical instruments abounds. Drums and bells are the dominant musical instruments founds, often casted with remarkable skill, even in today standards.

  • Dong Son culture adornments

    Region:Vietnam

    Period:Dong Son culture, IInd BC - Ist AD

    Media:bronze

    Little is known about the culture which occupied northern Vietnam between 3rd century BC and 1st AD.

    That culture have been called Dong Son from the region where were excavated the first metal objects in 1924.

    A huge variety of objects have been found: weaponry, living ustensils, jewelry and musical instruments abounds. Drums and bells are the dominant musical instruments founds, often casted with remarkable skill, even in today standards.

  • Anthropomorphic image, Indus Valley, ca. 1500 BC

    Region:India

    Period:Late Harappa, ca. 1500 BC

    Media:bronze

    This is an anthropomorphic image, from the Indus Valley, made in the late Harappa period.

    Private collection, Italy

  • Madjapahit head, Java, XIV-XVth century

    Region:Java

    Period:Madjapahit, XIV-XVth century

    Media:stone (andesite)

    The Majapahit empire was the last of the major Hindu empires of the Malay archipelago and is considered one of the greatest states in Indonesian history. The center was based in eastern Java from 1293 to around 1500, peking with the reign of Hayam Wuruk, from 1350 to 1389.

    Note the quite interesting detail of the coiffure in the back, that can be interpreted as an abstract face.

    Collection of Pastor H. Maas, The Netherlands

  • Standing buddha, XVIIIth century, Burma

    Region:Burma

    Period:XVIIIth century

    Media:Lacquered wood

    This is a very moving and tender portrait of the sakyamuni (historical) Buddha in Buddhapatra Mudra, standing on a lotus flower.

    He is holding an offering alms bowl, in a gesture that monks do to beg food.

    Collection Wayne Quasha

  • Buddha sakyamuni, Lan Na, XVIth century, Thailand

    Region:Thailand

    Period:Lan Na, XVIth century

    Media:bronze

    This is a protrait of the Buddha sakyamuni (the historical buddha) seated in sattvasana on a lotus throne. His right hand in bhumisparsa mudra (hanging downward, "touching" the earth, symbolizing Buddha’s enlightenment under the bodhi tree when he summoned the earth goddess Sthavara to bear witness to his enlightenment) and his left hand in dhyana mudra (a gesture of meditation).

    He is wearing a sanghati with long sash, his ear lobes are elongated by the weight of the jewellery he weared as a prince. His face is portrayed with serene expression with downcast eyes, under arched eyebrows.

    Note the presence of an ancient restoration in the neck.

    Collection R. Van de Kerkhof, The Netherlands

  • Seated Khmer Deva, XIth century, Cambodia

    Region:Cambodia

    Period:XIth century

    Media:bronze

    Devas (in Khmer called tep or preah) are non-human beings more powerful or more blissful than humans. Those, for instance, living in the RupaLoka.

    From a human perspective, devas share the characteristic of being invisible to the physical human eye and can only be detected by those humans who have opened an extrasensory power by which one can see beings from other planes. Their voices can also be heard by those who have cultivated a similar power of the ear.

    Most devas are also capable of constructing illusory forms by which they can manifest themselves to the beings of lower worlds; higher and lower devas even have to do this between each other.

    Collection Klinker (according to owner)
    Private French collection

  • Female divinity, Angkor period (XIIth century), Cambodia

    Region:Cambodia

    Period:Angkor, XIIth century

    Media:bronze no information, sorry !

  • Gahu miniature, Tibet, XIXth century

    Region:Tibet

    Period:XIXth century

    Media:silver

    Gahu are amulets enclosed in a precious case inscribed with religious diagrams (see the back view). They are usually weared as pendant, arout the waist or hung to the saddle of a horse. This one features the image of the buddha, supposed to protect his owner.

  • Undetermined asian object

    Region:unknown

    Period:unknown

    Media:unknown no information, sorry !